Dakin Responds to Unexpected Urgent Intake of Guinea Pigs

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Dakin staff perform intake exam on a guinea pig

On May 25th, Dakin was faced with an unexpected intake. Shortly after the shelter’s doorbell sounded, staff members were hurriedly getting into protective gowns and gloves to assess the health of 28 guinea pigs who had been found in a box. A Good Samaritan discovered them next to a dumpster and kindly took the time to bring them to Dakin for care.

As staff performed intake exams, it was quickly apparent that many of the female guinea pigs were pregnant. The team also began seeing physical symptoms of ringworm, a contagious fungal infection that affects the skin. Ringworm is spread from contact with infected skin or surfaces. Treatment for ringworm takes two-three months of daily care including oral medication, fungal cultures, and medicated baths.

This intake brings Dakin’s guinea pig population to over 50, creating a massive strain on staff and resources. The veterinary and animal care teams are also working to care for over 200 animals who were already in our care prior to this intake. As the busy summer months roll in, that number will steadily increase.

How you can help

SIGN UP for our guinea pig waitlist. After a tremendous response from our community, our emergent need for adopters and foster caregivers has been met. However, a guinea pig baby boom is expected in the coming months due to the number of pregnant females in this group. Click here to access our waitlist. You'll be notified when the young guinea pigs become available for adoption.

FOSTER to help reduce the number of animals in the shelter. While our need for foster homes for this particular group has been met, there are many opportunities to be a foster caregiver to animals in need. Start the process here.

DONATE to support the care and treatment that goes into animals with medical needs. The cost of supplies to treat one guinea pig for ringworm is $250 and over 20 have tested positive. Please, give today.

Your support allows Dakin to respond to emergencies, provide care, and save lives when animals need you most. Thank you.

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